Dentist’s Technographic Profiles

by Larry Emmott on October 6, 2010

in Internet,Management

In the business bestseller Groundswell: Winning in a World Transformed by Social Technologies authors Charlene Li and John Bernoff present the concept of a Technographic Profile. This is a description of the manner in which individuals interact with technology and the Internet. They describe six different profiles; Creators, Critics, Collectors, Joiners, Spectators and finally Inactive, which means they are connected but do not participate online.

  • Creators publish blogs upload video and write articles; about 18% of US adults are considered Creators.
  • Critics react to online content with comments, ratings and reviews. Since it is easier to react then create as you would expect there are more critics at 26%.
  • Collectors save URLs and tags on social bookmarking sites like Digg and use RSS and other services to aggregate content. Only 12% of adults are Collectors.
  • Joiners participate by creating online profiles on social networking sites like Facebook. This is growing rapidly. At least 25% are Joiners and probably a lot more.
  • Spectators consume what the others produce. Since this takes the least effort it is the largest group at 48%.

Net32 the online supply company commissioned a survey to determine the Technographic Profile of dentists. Here is what they found:

Overall, dentists fall most strongly into the category of Critics, over 40% of dentists identified themselves as such by their interests and activities. Remember only 26% of the general population are classified as Critics.

Dentists also showed up strongly as Collectors (people who receive real-time updates from sites that interest them, tag photos, rate websites, and suggest websites). At 26% Collectors dentists more than doubled the 12% online US adult Collectors.

When it comes to Creators only 10%  identified themselves as Creators surprisingly below the 18% of online US adults who are classified as such.

More detail:

 

With regard to at least monthly visitation dentists preferred (70%) online forums or discussion groups, to social networks (58%) like Facebook, Twitter,or LinkedIn. DentalTown was the runaway favorite with DrBicuspid a distant second.

43% of dentists reported that they did not visit social networking sites, while about 28% maintained a profile, added comments, or only read the pages. Facebook blew away the competition with 93% of dentists favoring that site. LinkedIn and Twitter were a distant second and third place.

There was very little interest in blogs, with 66% of dentists not visiting blogs all.

49% of dentists reported that they read dental industry ratings and reviews while 12% indicated that they posted dental industry ratings and reviews. 58% of dentists indicated that the DentalTown website was their favorite, leading all others.

When asked “In general, what are you most interested in reading, watching, or hearing, online concerning the dental industry?” Respondents favored product information (specs, features, use and care), product purchasing information (pricing, sourcing), and CE.

For more information stop by the Net32 booth # 1539 in Orlando.

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Dear Dentist: Always the Critic? You Need a Creator! « Modern Dental Practice Marketing
October 7, 2010 at 6:45 am
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October 15, 2010 at 4:35 am

{ 2 comments }

Joe Spencer October 19, 2010 at 10:48 am

excellent info!!! thanks for providing it for us. I will be forwarding it to several non-Dentaltown groups.

Why do you think that dentists prefer forums like Dentaltown to true social media like LinkedIn? is it the sense of hiding behind a fictitious username? The profiles are of little value to really understand who is talking in Dentaltown… and that seems to lead people to be less gentle in their replies to “dumb questions”… at least that’s my thoughts.

By the way… I loved Groundswell, it was one of my first SM books.

Larry Emmott October 20, 2010 at 1:44 pm

I have very mixed feelings on anonymous comments and postings. On the one hand it allows people the freedom to say what they mean on the other hand it seems inevitably to lead to flame wars and stupid remarks. Which I am willing to say under my own real name. :-)

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