A broken clock is right twice a day. A broken hard drive is not.

by Larry Emmott on October 18, 2009

in Security

Back Up: Whatever method you use – onsite, offsite, external hard drives, tapes, etc. – to backup your data, the basics are the same. The first step is to create a master backup of your data. This should include everything! The second step is to configure and begin a regular – preferably daily – backup routine that updates your master files. The critical part of the process is to ensure these backups are regular, consistent, and frequent enough to minimize the impact of any loss.

Excerpt from Lions Gate Newsletter.

Back it up!

Wouldn’t it be great if you didn’t have to buy insurance until after your car was stolen? Or if you could pay for your lottery ticket only after finding out it’s a winner? Unfortunately, the world just doesn’t work that way, and proactive measures ensure your investments. The same is true of your critical data. The most essential function of your IT staff is to back up your data, and to do so now, while you can. You can’t file a claim without an insurance policy, and you certainly can’t restore data that hasn’t been stored safely.

Yes, It does happen. And it’s no fun!
Every day, companies of all sizes lose critical data to hardware failure, theft, fire and other catastrophes. Few realize how much they have invested into the data on their hard drive until it’s too late. The loss of financial data (Receivables, Payables, and Tax Information) can be devastating to any business. But also consider the cost of replacing hardware and software, and the cost of your IT consultant or employees setting up hardware, installing software and configuring everything to work the way you like it. Add to this the days of lost productivity while you and your staff struggle without e-mail addresses, internet bookmarks and client data, and you’re likely out thousands of dollars in lost time alone! How much is your time worth?

Your backup plan.
Whatever method you use – onsite, offsite, external hard drives, tapes, etc. – to backup your data, the basics are the same. The first step is to create a master backup of your data. This should include everything! The second step is to configure and begin a regular – preferably daily – backup routine that updates your master files. The critical part of the process is to ensure these backups are regular, consistent, and frequent enough to minimize the impact of any loss.

It’s painless and inexpensive!
A comprehensive system of backups is not necessarily an expensive proposition, especially when compared to the costs you’ll face without such a system in place. The ever-advancing data storage market is delivering faster, more reliable, less expensive media (hard drives, DVDs, CDs, tape drives), and doing so at prices that are easily within most companies’ budgets. There is no one-size-fits-all solution for data backup, but there is a perfect solution for you if you know what your needs are. The one factor that is the same for every business is that backups are critical.

A broken clock is right twice a day. A broken hard drive is not.
Even if you have one of these storage methods in place, how do you know it is working properly and actually backing up? An effective backup system is designed to monitor its work and alert you when backups aren’t taking place as scheduled. If these messages are ignored, the result is the same as if you didn’t back up at all.

Take it outside.
With critical or sensitive data, an ideal solution is to store copies of your backups offsite. Depending on your needs, this can be as simple as carrying a hard drive home with you each night. A more efficient solution is to contract a third party to maintain secure, offsite backups of your data. This provides increased protection against theft, fire and natural disasters in addition to concerns about viruses and hardware failure.

The bottom line.
You can buy the highest quality hardware and perform all the regular maintenance the manufacturer suggests, but all hardware will eventually fail for one reason or another. By taking preventative measures now, you can turn potential disasters into little more than a minor inconvenience. Combine a small investment with a handful of foresight, and you’ll be prepared for the worst.

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