Are We Adequately Securing Personal Health Information?

by Larry Emmott on April 7, 2010

in Security

I have assumed a rather casual attitude toward data security. In large part because I often see vendors using scare tactics to sell dentists stuff we don’t really need. And the scare stories make dentists reluctant to use new technology. If we do not understand something it can be unsettling and we tend to do nothing.

The linked article discusses some of the issues that large aggregators of health care records face. That is hospitals, insurance companies and the proposed new central health care record registry. These issues seem to be real and there are no sure fire solutions. On the other hand the article indicates that for the most part the organizations in charge of this data take their security responsibilities seriously and follow protocol. The problem is that protocol may not be good enough.

You can lock the doors and secure the deadbolts even put bars on the windows but any thief with enough motivation can eventually break in.

The good news to keep in mind is that the data most at risk is not a single practitioner dentist but a large clinic, hospital or third party.

In a discussion about electronic health records (EHRs) a couple weeks ago, one of the Human Resource team members at a prospective client said, “I don’t believe it’s possible to secure electronic health data. It’s always an accident waiting to happen.”

via The Health Care Blog: Are We Adequately Securing Personal Health Information?.

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